Monthly Archives: October 2007

Latest entry on Brijit: Cheech Marin

Q&A – Cheech Marin

Marin has come a long way since he paired with Tommy Chong more than 25 years ago, transforming from a pot-propped comic into a multidimensional entertainer. As a collector and curator of Chicano arts, he was recently recognized with the Smithsonian Latino Center’s Legacy Award. In this short, casual interview he discusses the layering of symbolism in Chicano art — “a combination of high and low art” — and offers a few quips on stereotypes and comedy.
In Smithsonian by David Zax, October 2007
This abstract was edited by Brijit.
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Latest entry on Brijit.com

Night of the Killer Lamp: 23 Ridiculous Horror-Movie Adversaries

The AV Club catalogs the movies’ weirdest ways of bumping off the innocent and unsuspecting, including mayhem caused by nature (vampire dogs and trees), technology (murderous elevators and vending machines) and even a rapping leprechaun for good measure. Complete with video clips, the older selections are generally best for amateurish effects. It’s ideal bathroom material — although sadly confined to your desk.

In A.V. Club by A.V. Club, 29 October 2007

This abstract was edited by Brijit.


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New book reviews on the art of War

Ken Burns revolutionized the television documentary. First it was “The Civil War,” then “Baseball” and “Jazz.” Each of these topics had been adequately covered in the past, but never to the extent of what has come to be known as the “Burnsian style.” For each project, he and his dedicated staff painstakingly assembled hundreds of still photos, which they made come alive through careful camera movement. He gathered letters and other documents and engaged dozens of familiar performers to act as “agents,” reading from these materials to dramatically present the smaller stories that pieced together the larger fabric of his chosen topic.

Read the rest of the review on Bookreporter.com

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The literary world lost one of its “best and brightest” when David Halberstam was killed in a car accident in April 2007. His final gift — to established fans and potentially new ones — is THE COLDEST WINTER, perhaps the most dramatic and damning accounts of the Korean War ever put to paper.

Read the rest of the review on Bookreporter.com.

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Filed under Book Review by RK